School board for Vedic education a step forward, but selection of private party to run it questionable

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The government body found entrepreneur Ramdev’s Patanjali Yogpeeth Trust’s offer to set up the BSB the best out of the three proposals submitted.
Patanjali’s Trust reportedly expressed an intent to commit Rs 21 crore for the development of the BSB and claimed that it has the necessary infrastructure ready for the construction of the Board’s headquarters.
A proposal for India’s first national school board for Vedic education, the Bharatiya Shiksha Board (BSB), was accepted in a meeting of an autonomous body under the Union HRD ministry. The body, the Maharshi Sandipani Rashtriya Vedavidya Pratishthan (MSRVVP), a fully-funded autonomous institution with the objective of promoting ‘Vedic knowledge’, released an Expression of Interest (EoI) on February 11, inviting applicants to submit proposals for establishing the BSB. According to The Indian Express, proposals to the MSRVVP were to be vetted only if they were furnished by February 19, giving aspirants a tight eight-day deadline to submit their proposal. The BSB will be the first private educational board to be certified by the Centre and, on Saturday, the government body found entrepreneur Ramdev’s Patanjali Yogpeeth Trust’s offer to set up the BSB the best out of the three proposals submitted. Patanjali’s Trust reportedly expressed an intent to commit Rs 21 crore for the development of the BSB and claimed that it has the necessary infrastructure ready for the construction of the Board’s headquarters. However, surely, setting up of an education board should involve more than just funding and physical infrastructure, especially when matters of pedagogy and methods of historiography are at stake. The importance of academically studying the Vedas—both to unlock the knowledge these contain as well as to examine them critically—is undeniable; Vedic-age debates are integral to the study of history in the country.
However, it is important to temper the need to study the Vedas and promote Vedic education with the fact that our understanding of ancient India should not simply be reduced to what the Vedas—or any other such texts—say since ancient India exhibited pluralities. That said, the effort to mainstream Vedic education would surely serve modern India and the understanding of its past better.vedic

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